Traditional recipes

Marmalade cake recipe

Marmalade cake recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Cake
  • Cakes with fruit
  • Citrus cakes

A traditional Scottish cake, ideal for afternoon tea. This cake disappeared fast when I took it in to share at work - even a colleague said she "didn't like marmalade but that cake was great!"


Dunbartonshire, Scotland, UK

231 people made this

IngredientsServes: 12

  • 225g self-raising flour
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 115g margarine
  • 85g caster sugar
  • 1 teaspoon orange rind, finely grated
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2 good tablespoons thick cut orange marmalade
  • 2 tablespoons milk

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:1hr ›Ready in:1hr15min

  1. Preheat the oven to 170 C / Gas 3. Grease a 1lb loaf tin (or a 6 inch/15cm round cake tin).
  2. Sieve the flour and salt into a bowl, rub in the margarine until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs.
  3. Stir in the sugar and half the orange rind; then add the eggs, marmalade and milk.
  4. Mix well to achieve the consistency of a thick batter. Don't worry about the occasional wee lump, remember there's orange rind in the mix! Pour the mixture into the prepared tin.
  5. Bake in the center of the preheated oven until golden brown, about 1 hour. Allow to cool for 5 minutes in the tin, then tip out onto a wire rack.
  6. While the cake is still warm, spread a thin layer of apricot glaze OR warmed marmalade over the top then sprinkle the remaining grated orange peel to garnish. Allow to cool, then slice and enjoy.

Other ideas

Actually, I doubled the quantities and used a 2lb loaf tin - it had to go around a lot of people! Worked fine.

Tip

If you have a fan-assisted oven, preheat to 150 C / Gas 2 and bake for 55 minutes.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(14)

Reviews in English (15)

I made this with the addition of 1 tsp of orange essence (available from Sainsburys)to increase the orange flavour. The glazing of the top with marmalade with the addtional sprinkling of grated orange peel gave it a wonderful flavour. The texture was very good and it came out nicely moist. I doubled up the quantities and baked it for about 1hour 10 mins in a 8" tin and it created quite an impressive cake. Certainly make it again.-31 Jan 2012

Very nice with a cup of tea. Very easy to make. Added loads (3 oranges) worth of orange rind, because i`m naughty like that! and used the juice from the oranges to make a orange sauce to pour over the cake. Delicious.-04 Jul 2012

I made this cake for my boss for a business meeting. It looked great and there was none left for me so it must have been good!!-18 Jun 2012


Esther's Orange-Marmalade Layer Cake (Mitford Series)

For the Cake
3 cups cake flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup softened unsalted butter
2 cups granulated sugar
3 large eggs, at room temperature, beaten lightly
1 tablespoon grated orange zest
1 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup buttermilk, at room temperature

For the Orange Syrup
1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
1/4 cup granulated sugar

For the Filling
1 cup orange marmalade

For the Frosting
3/4 cup well-chilled heavy cream
3 tablespoons sugar
3/4 cup well-chilled sour cream


Instructions

Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/gas 4. Put the soft butter into a mixing bowl and beat with a wooden spoon or electric mixer for 1 minute or until creamy. Gradually beat in the sugar, then continue beating until the mixture becomes paler and fluffy.

Gradually add the eggs, beating well after each addition add a tablespoon of the flour with the last portion of egg. Sift the remaining flour, the salt and baking powder into the bowl and gently fold into the mixture with a large metal spoon. When thoroughly combined add the marmalade and milk and stir in.

Spoon the mixture into the prepared tin and spread evenly. Bake for 50 to 55 minutes or until a good golden brown and firm to the touch. Run a round-bladed knife around the inside of the tin to loosen the cake, then carefully turn out onto a wire rack. Gently warm the second portion of marmalade and brush over the top of the warm cake. Leave to cool completely.

Sift the icing sugar into a bowl, add the warm water and mix to a smooth, runny icing using a wooden spoon. Spoon the icing over the cake and let it run down the sides - the chunks of marmalade will stick up through the icing. Leave until set before cutting. Store in an airtight container and eat within 5 days.


Marmalade cake recipe

Preheat oven to 190°C/375°F/Gas Mark 5. Grease two 20cm cake tins and line with baking paper.

Beat together butter/margarine and sugar until creamy. Add beaten eggs one at a time. Add warm water and salt. Mix in flour and beat well.

Pour half the mixture into each tin. Bake in the centre of the oven for 25 minutes, or until golden and risen.

Take sponges from tins and leave to cool on wire rack. Remove baking paper after cake has cooled.

Cream together butter and icing sugar until mixture is soft. Add two or three drops of vanilla essence and sandwich the sponge halves together with layer of marmalade and thin layer of buttercream.

Spread butter cream thickly on top of cake and sprinkle with orange peel.


First, in a large mixing bowl combine the flour, baking powder and sugar, then rub the butter into the dry ingredients until the mixture is coarsely crumbled.

Add the grated lemon and orange rinds, the mixed spice and dried fruit. Stir all these together and add the milk a little at a time, followed by the vinegar. Stir until all the ingredients are evenly distributed, then stir in the marmalade – and you should have a good dropping consistency (so that if you tap a spoonful of the mixture on the side of the bowl, it drops off easily – you can adjust this with a touch more milk if necessary). Why not make your own Seville Orange Marmalade? You can watch how to make it in our Online Cookery School Video on this page.

Now spread the mixture evenly in the prepared tin using the back of a tablespoon, and sprinkle the top with the demerara sugar. Bake on a lower shelf so the top of the tin is aligned with the centre of the oven for 1¼ hours or until the cake feels firm in the centre. (After the cake has had 50 minutes, cover loosely with a piece of foil to prevent the sugar burning.)

Leave to cool in the tin for 10 minutes before turning out onto a wire cooling rack.

Store in its liner in an airtight tin – it does improve with keeping.


Marmalade Coconut Semolina Cake

Published: Jun 4, 2014 · Modified: Mar 1, 2018 by Bintu · This post may contain affiliate links.

Deliciously moist Marmalade Coconut Semolina Cake.

This marmalade coconut semolina cake is one of the reasons Yotam Ottolenghi and I are best friends.

Ok, he does not know that we are best friends. But I know that if he knows that I know that we are best friends, we would be best friends. For now though, his cooks books and I are tight.

There are two parts to making this popular Middle Eastern cake. The cake itself and the soaking syrup. Feel free to make it exactly as it appears in Jerusalem. However I absolutely love it without adding the syrup. That way I get to eat this as a breakfast bread, or with soups, yoghurt or even salads. And simply as a cake with some tea. See what combination works for you (that&rsquos the fun part).

If you want more semolina recipes then why not try this Semolina Cake.

OH and the kiddoes have promised (with just a teeny weeny bit of hinting from me) to make me this cake for my next quarter birthday, half birthday and main birthday. Lucky, lucky me.

Don't forget to tag #recipesfromapantry on Instagram or Twitter if you try Marmalade Coconut Semolina Cake ! It is really, really awesome for me when you make one of my recipes and I'd love to see it. You can also share it on my Facebook page. Please pin this recipe to Pinterest too! Thank you for reading Recipes from a Pantry.


Related Video

I followed the recipe to the letter including sifting the dry ingredients twice and it turned out exceptionally well. It is very moist and makes a delicious dessert. If I would add anything to it, it would more orange marmalade between layers. Perhaps I would use a jar and one fourth.

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Yogurt-Marmalade Cake

Spray a loaf pan with non-stick baking spray (or grease and flour it if it makes your skirt fly up). Sift together the flour, baking powder and salt. Set aside.

In a separate bowl, mix together 1 cup of yogurt, sugar, eggs, vanilla, lemon zest, and canola oil until just combined. Pour over dry ingredients and mix until just combined do not over beat.

Pour into a loaf pan and bake for 45 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool slightly. Remove from pan. While cake is cooling, pour marmalade into a sauce pan. Heat it on low until melted, stirring occasionally. Add 1/4 cup of yogurt to the pan and turn off heat. Stir to combine, then pour slowly over the top of the cake, allowing icing to pool around the sides.

When I was a child, I was scared of orange marmalade. Unlike the super sweet grape and strawberry jam to which my tastebuds had grown accustomed, the peel in orange marmalade was always way too bitter for my tastes. Then, when I was a teen, a friend of mine brought some delicious muffins to Nutcracker rehearsal, and after first proclaiming loudly that there was &ldquono way I&rsquom going to eat those fat-and-calorie-laden things when I have to get onstage in an Arabian Princess costume in less than three weeks!&rdquo I took one whiff of the suckers&hellipand I wound up scarfing down four of them. And the Nutcracker has never been jigglier.

I never forgot those muffins. They were delightfully light and moist, and were iced with a thin, creamy glaze containing, it would turn out, orange marmalade.

A couple of years ago, I came across a recipe in a magazine (Bon Apetit or Gourmet, I think) for a pound cake with an orange marmalade glaze drizzled over the top. Immediately, the lightbulb went on and I remembered The Muffins. The Nutcracker Muffins. The Arabian Princess Gut-Jiggle Muffins with the delightful marmalade icing. The magazine pound cake contained plain yogurt, and while I&rsquod never been much of a yogurt person, my mother had visited recently and had left behind a great big container of the stuff. I made the cake that day and loved it, and have regularly used plain yogurt in my baking ever since.

Slowly, over time, I created my own version, based on the magazine recipe but tweaked in several ways to most closely resemble my ballet friend&rsquos famous marmalade muffins. In my opinion, the yogurt is what makes the cake wonderful: it&rsquos moist, light, spongy and delicious. And the orange marmalade icing (which also contains yogurt) just takes it over the top. If you&rsquove been scared of orange marmalade your whole life, you don&rsquot have to be afraid anymore.


Preheat the oven to 180°C, fan 160°C, gas 4. Butter a 7cm-deep, 20cm round springform tin and line the base with baking paper.

Whisk together the butter, caster sugar, eggs, self-raising flour, baking powder and ground almonds until combined. Spoon into the prepared tin, smooth the top and bake on a baking tray for 1 hour.

Meanwhile, whisk the icing sugar with the marmalade, orange zest and juice. Set aside to dissolve.

As soon as the cake comes out of the oven, prick all over the top with a skewer and spoon over the marmalade syrup. Leave to cool in the tin before serving.

Kitchen secret: m armalade also works well on pancakes &ndash warm through, drizzle over and serve with cold mascarpone.


Marmalade Pudding Cake

Now, this is a beauty. I don't mean flash or fancy - rather the opposite there is something austerely handsome about its appearance, and yet gorgeously warming about its taste. But then, this laid-back Sunday-lunch pudding is what kitchen food is all about. I'm happy to leave the picture-perfect plate-decoration dessert to the professional chef and patissier. When I want to eat one, I'll go to a restaurant. That way, everyone's happy.

I don't want to be too prescriptive about this marmalade pudding cake - which has the surprisingly light texture of a steamed sponge - as it doesn't seem in the spirit of things. I love the bitter edge of a thick-shred, dark marmalade and so tend to go for a proper, glamorously auburn, tawny one here if this is too full-on for you, choose a fine-shred marmalade, instead.

For US cup measures, use the toggle at the top of the ingredients list.

Now, this is a beauty. I don't mean flash or fancy - rather the opposite there is something austerely handsome about its appearance, and yet gorgeously warming about its taste. But then, this laid-back Sunday-lunch pudding is what kitchen food is all about. I'm happy to leave the picture-perfect plate-decoration dessert to the professional chef and patissier. When I want to eat one, I'll go to a restaurant. That way, everyone's happy.

I don't want to be too prescriptive about this marmalade pudding cake - which has the surprisingly light texture of a steamed sponge - as it doesn't seem in the spirit of things. I love the bitter edge of a thick-shred, dark marmalade and so tend to go for a proper, glamorously auburn, tawny one here if this is too full-on for you, choose a fine-shred marmalade, instead.