Traditional recipes

Strozzapreti with Ramps

Strozzapreti with Ramps

Separate the ramp greens from the white parts. Bring a pot of water to a boil and set up an ice bath. Blanch 1/2 of the ramp greens, then remove using a pair of tongs to the ice bath. Keep the water boiling.

Transfer the blanched ramp greens to a blender and purée. Slice the remaining ramp greens into 1-inch pieces.

Blanch the fava beans, shock in the ice bath, and drain.

Refill the pot with fresh water and season heavily with salt — it should taste like the ocean. Dice the white parts of the ramps very finely. Then, drain the pasta and reserve some of the cooking water.

Meanwhile, in a large sauté pan, sauté the ramp bottoms, shallot, and garlic until tender but before they begin to color.

Add the blanched favas and cooked pasta to the large pan. Add the sliced ramp greens, butter, a little pasta water, and ramp purée. Toss together until butter is melted. Finish with extra-virgin olive oil and piment d'Espelette.


Recipe Summary

  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 ounces pancetta, finely chopped
  • 1 medium onion, halved and thinly sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1/2 cup minced flat-leaf parsley
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped mint
  • 2 tablespoons minced celery leaves
  • 1 dried red chile, crumbled
  • One 28-ounce can imported tomatoes, preferably from San Marzano
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 pound dried strozzapreti pasta
  • Freshly grated Grana Padana or Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

Heat the oil in a large saucepan. Add the pancetta and cook over moderately high heat until it begins to brown, about 3 minutes. Add the onion and garlic and cook, stirring, until the onion softens, about 4 minutes. Add the parsley, mint, celery leaves and red chile and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Add the tomatoes and their liquid and simmer over moderately high heat, crushing the tomatoes with a wooden spoon, until the sauce is thick, about 25 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

Cook the pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring, until slightly underdone. Drain the pasta lightly, then add it to the sauce and cook for about 1 1/2 minutes longer, until just al dente. Transfer the strozzapreti to a warmed bowl and pass the cheese separately.


Preparation

Soffritto

Step 1

Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion, carrot, and celery and cook, stirring often, until lightly golden, 5–8 minutes season with salt and pepper. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook, stirring often, until vegetables have reduced in volume by two-thirds, 15–20 minutes. Add paprika and cook, stirring often, 5 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl.

Step 2

DO AHEAD: Soffritto can be made 2 days ahead. Let cool cover and chill.

Pasta

Step 3

Heat 2 Tbsp. oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add half of mushrooms season with salt and pepper. Cook, tossing, until browned and softened, 8–10 minutes transfer to a bowl. Repeat with 2 Tbsp. oil and remaining mushrooms reserve skillet.

Step 4

Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until al dente, 8–10 minutes. Drain, reserving 1 cup pasta cooking liquid.

Step 5

Heat 2 Tbsp. oil in reserved skillet over medium-low heat. Cook garlic, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Toss in soffritto, mushrooms, pasta, lemon juice, 2 Tbsp. chives, and half of Parmesan, thinning with pasta cooking liquid as needed season with salt and pepper. Serve topped with ricotta, eggs, if using, more chives, and remaining Parmesan and drizzle with oil.

How would you rate Strozzapreti with Mushrooms and Ricotta?

This was fabulous! And super quick- bonus! Highly recommend using homemade ricotta which really made it luxurious, even with lame white mushrooms. Would love to try again with a more interesting mushroom mix. Only other edit was tripling the garlic because more garlic is always better. This recipe is a keeper- so simple, but such complex flavors, compliments galore!

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Preparation

Step 1

Preheat oven to 350°. Season oxtails with salt and pepper. Heat 2 Tbsp. oil in a large heavy pot over medium-high and cook oxtails until deeply browned all over, 15–18 minutes transfer to a bowl.

Step 2

Meanwhile, finely chop onion, carrots, and celery in a food processor.

Step 3

Cook vegetables in same pot, stirring often, until soft, 5–7 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Return oxtails to pot and add wine, broth, and 2 tsp. rosemary. Oxtails should be just covered top off with water if needed. Bring to a simmer, cover, and transfer to oven. Braise, checking halfway through to make sure oxtails are covered at least two-thirds of the way up, until meat is falling off the bone, 2–2½ hours. Remove oxtails from liquid. When cool enough to handle, shred meat and return to sauce discard bones.

Step 4

Meanwhile, toss breadcrumbs with remaining 2 Tbsp. oil on a rimmed baking sheet, squeezing bread to help it absorb oil. Bake until golden brown, 5–7 minutes let cool. Stir breadcrumbs, horseradish, and remaining 1 tsp. rosemary in a medium bowl.

Step 5

Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until very al dente (pasta will still be opaque and very firm in the center). Drain pasta, reserving 1½ cups pasta cooking liquid.

Step 6

Bring ragù to a simmer over medium-high heat. Add pasta and 1 cup pasta cooking liquid and cook, tossing often and adding more cooking liquid to help finish cooking pasta, until pasta is al dente and sauce is thickened and coats pasta, about 5 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve pasta topped with horseradish breadcrumbs.

Step 7

Do Ahead: Ragù can be made 4 days ahead. Let cool cover and chill.

How would you rate Strozzapreti with Oxtail Ragù and Horseradish Crumbs?

This was wonderful, with a few caveats. I doubled the recipe and found that it took a very, very long time to reduce into a nice ragu. I followed the recipe to completion the day prior to serving, and ended up with a brothy stew. Refrigerated overnight, then reduced uncovered at a simmer for a full 8 hours. I added some red chili flakes, and used several glugs of red wine (in addition to the previous white) for the final reduction stage. I also found the breadcrumbs did not add anything to the dish. If you (like me) have never prepared oxtail, prepare for a significant time commitment post-braise to shred meat and sift through for cartilage.

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Strozzapreti Pasta with Imported Italian Tuna Recipe

Last night I needed to come up with a quick meal for the family. My oldest daughter had a tennis clinic so we started a little late.

We talked about going out for dinner but both girls said they had too much homework and wanted to stay in and order takeout sushi. These girls will find any excuse to order sushi but I said no to that so now what do I prepare?

I love to keep our pantry filled with interesting food items for occasions just like this when I want to put together a quick meal but still want it to be a little different and taste great. I call these meals “quick & easy” and on the newly designed site, I’ll have a category for these recipes.

I’ve been stocking up my pantry with some very cool items I’ve found on Amazon and because we are signed up as a “Prime” members, we get free 2-day shipping on all items fulfilled by Amazon.

Several of the items for this meal were ordered online from Amazon and stock my pantry. Yes, you typically have to order by the case, but often a case is just 6 items.

And if you are ordering items with long shelf lives or that you use a lot, it really doesn’t matter. It’s sort of like shopping at Costco but online.

4/28/12 Updade – My friend Chef Ricco DeLuca suggested adding some fresh cracked pepper, fresh Italian parsley and a sprinkle of extra virgin olive oil so I am adding these ingredients to this recipe. Ricco is one of the best cooks I know so if he says this recipe will be better with these ingredients, I trust it will.

Strozzapreti Pasta

I already ordered a bunch of new and interesting pastas like the strozzapreti pasta that I wanted to try out but now that I’m experimenting with a gluten free diet for a while, I decided to prepare two different pastas, one for my wife and kids and one for me.

The girls have already told me they have no problem with the rice flour pasta but they were excited to try the interesting looking strozzapreti.

Strozzapreti translated is “priest choker” in Italian.

Not sure how it received its unfortunate name but according to Wikipedia there are a few legends that may explain its history. One is that “gluttonous priests were so enthralled by the savory pasta that they ate too quickly and choked themselves, sometimes to death.”

There’s another legend mentioned that goes, “wives would customarily make the pasta for churchmen as partial payment for land rents in Romagna, and their husbands would be angered enough by the venal priests eating their wives’ food to wish the priests would choke as they stuffed their mouth with it.”

Neither sound that appetizing but I can assure you my girls enjoyed the pasta, went back for seconds, and didn’t choke on it.

The pasta is made from strips of pasta dough that are twisted by hand (I’m sure commercial pasta manufacturers have machines that do this), cut into 10 cm lengths, and are not uniform in size or shape. Find it at Amazon at strozzapreti pasta.

Italian Jarred Tuna

For a dish like this, you want to try and find imported Italian tuna. There is simply no comparison to the everyday canned tuna we buy for making tuna fish sandwiches.

Yes, it is more expensive than most tuna but the meat comes from the finest cuts of yellowfin tuna and with a $7.00 jar you can feed a family of four with leftovers for school lunches the next day.

I purchased the Tonnino Tuna Ventresca in Olive Oil at Amazon. According to Tonnino’s, this is their “créme de la créme of their product line.

Imagine an extremely smooth, soft strip of tuna hand filleted from a small section of its underbelly and hand packed in its natural form.” It is really that good!

Artichoke Hearts

So we have pasta, tuna and now for some artichoke hearts. When I first had this dish while in Rome on my honeymoon at a friend’s home, the artichokes hearts were fresh and amazing.

Since this is a pantry pasta dish, I pulled out giant jar of artichoke hearts packed in water that I think I purchased at Costco. I usually have some smaller cans of artichoke hearts in the pantry but we must have run out.

You can also buy a case of these at Amazon at a really good price. Check out these artichoke hearts.

I suggest you don’t buy the marinated hearts because in my opinion the marinade doesn’t taste that good and you cannot get the flavor off the artichokes no matter how many times you rinse them off. Stick with the ones packed in water or brine and then add the flavors you want and by all means if you have the time, use fresh artichokes.

Kalamata Olives

Yes, you can purchase pitted Kalamata Olives at Amazon. I did once and they were terrific but it was a 5-pound bag of them.

That’s a lot of olives! You can purchase them in small sizes but olives are easy to find these days in most supermarkets and they’re a great item to have in your refrigerator at all times for all sorts of recipes and salads.

Pine Nuts

Sometimes called Pignoli nuts, these babies are getting expensive but they are so good when toasted and added to a dish like this. My wife suggested we add them to this pasta recipe and it was a great idea.

Pine nuts are the seeds that are found in the pine cones of certain species of pine trees. It’s a lot of work to gather and process pine nuts and maybe that’s why they are getting so expensive.

I purchase mine at Costco but I did check and you can purchase them on Amazon and have them shipped to you. Check out Amazon pine nuts.

That’s it. Besides some hot peppercorn flakes to give it another layer of flavor, we are ready to go. Normally I would add the peppercorn flakes to the sauce but then my kids wouldn’t eat it so I leave them out for whoever wants to add them to their dish to give it some fire.

Cheese or No Cheese

I posted a similar recipe to this back in 2007 that suggested finishing with grated Parmesan cheese as optional. Since then, I have learned from my good friend Chef Ricco DeLuca that combining cheese with fish sauces is not a good idea and he went on to say “his father would roll over in his grave if he ever combined the two.”

I don’t want any mass grave rolling so this time I’m going to say – No optional cheese.

Wheat Flour Strozzapreti Pasta and/or Gluten Free Penne Pasta with Tuna, Artichoke Hearts & Kalama Olives

It is a good idea to keep a well-stocked pantry so on nights you don’t know what to cook, you can come up with something special and just as important and easy!


Strozzapreti

Strozzapreti, meaning priest choker or strangler, look like large trofie or an elongated version of casarecce . Slight variations of this usually hand rolled pasta are traditional in most of Central Italy, especially Emilia-Romagna, Umbria, Tuscany and Marche. However, it’s also quite popular in the South.

Like many other Italian pasta types there are a number of stories about the origins of strozzapreti, which apparently existed even in the 14 th century. The one I like best claims that this pasta got its name during the times when the Catholic Church owned a great deal of the land in Romagna. The church rented it out to the farmers. The farmers’ wives would often make the local priest a pasta dish as a form of rent payment. The husbands, obviously angered by this practice, wished the priest choked while he was stuffing himself with the pasta!

Another theory is that the greedy priests were so enthralled by this particular type of pasta that they ate it too quickly and choked themselves, sometimes to death! Whatever its origins, the name seems to reflect a certain amount of anti-clericalism among the people of Central Italy in those days!

Strozzapreti are easy make at home!

Despite the fact that it is now possible to find commercially produced dried strozzapreti, it is still very often homemade. Some people make it with soft wheat flour and others use durum wheat flour. In Emilia-Romagna they don’t always use eggs to make it. But, in other regions they may include a little egg in the dough mix.

To make strozzapreti after you knead the dough, leave it to rest covered for 30 minutes or so. Then roll it out to about 1.5mm thickness and cut it into strips of 1.25cm in width.

These strips are either rolled between your palms or around a stick to get the right shape. Then you separate them into pieces of approx. 5-6cms in length or a bit longer. Homemade strozzapreti are rarely uniform in size and shape, but that adds to their appeal. Watch this video from Pasta Grannies to see how it’s done!

Recipes with strozzapreti.

In Emilia-Romagna strozzapreti are normally served with a mixed minced meat or sausage ragu but they can also be combined with vegetarian sauces such as a traditional tomato sauce or with seafood, especially in coastal areas.

A popular seafood recipe is with mantis shrimp or with swordfish. In Marche, you can find them eaten with a pancetta based sauce A maybe less traditional but still delicious idea is serving them with pesto. Since strozzapreti are quite similar to Ligurian trofie, they combine well with most types of pesto too. In addition there is even a sweet recipe for cinnamon flavoured strozzapreti, which I am dying to try!

For would-be homemade pasta makers I would recommend trying to make strozzapreti at home as it’s fun and not madly difficult, but if you prefer there are also a number of pasta makers that now make a dried version. Many of these are artisan producers but even Barilla produces this pasta as part of its Emiliane line.


Spring Strozzapreti Pasta

From the Test Kitchen

Strozzapreti pasta is a larger version of cavatelli, traditionally made by rolling out pasta dough by hand, then giving it a light twist. It’s chewy and fantastic at picking up sauce. The sauce we’re coating it with here is delicious: a cream reduction flavored with piquant Parmesan, the sauce is, at its base, enriched with the flavors of the season. We’re starting it by sautéing two spring vegetables, asparagus and English peas, to bring out their earthy and sweet flavors. Lastly, we’re finishing the pasta in it and garnishing the finished dish with mint and scallions.

Title

Wash and dry the fresh produce. Heat a large pot of salted water to boiling on high. Cut off and discard the root ends of the scallions thinly slice the scallions, separating the white bottoms and green tops. Shell the peas. Snap off and discard the tough, woody ends of the asparagus cut the asparagus into ½-inch pieces on an angle. Peel and mince the shallot to get 2 tablespoons of minced shallot (you may have extra) place in a medium bowl with the vinegar and season with salt and pepper to taste. Cut off and discard the root end of the lettuce separate the leaves. Pick the mint leaves off the stems discard the stems.

Add the pasta to the pot of boiling water. Cook 6 to 8 minutes, or until just shy of al dente (still slightly firm to the bite). Reserving ¾ cup of the pasta cooking water, thoroughly drain the cooked pasta. Set aside in a warm place.

While the pasta cooks, in a large pan, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the peas, asparagus and white bottoms of the scallions season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 1 to 2 minutes, or until the asparagus and peas are bright green. Add the heavy cream and simmer, stirring occasionally, 3 to 5 minutes, or until the sauce has thickened.

While the vegetables and sauce simmer, add the mustard to the shallot-vinegar mixture. Whisk in 2 tablespoons of olive oil until thoroughly combined.

To the pan of vegetables and sauce, add the cooked pasta, Parmesan cheese, butter and ½ cup of the reserved pasta cooking water season with salt and pepper to taste. Cook, stirring frequently, 2 to 4 minutes, or until the pasta is thoroughly coated. (If the sauce seems dry, gradually add the remaining pasta cooking water to achieve your desired consistency.) Transfer to a serving dish.

Place the lettuce in a large bowl season with salt and pepper. Add enough of the dressing to coat the lettuce (you may have extra dressing) toss to mix and season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to a serving dish. Garnish the finished pasta with the mint. Garnish the pasta and salad with the green tops of the scallions. Enjoy!

Tips from Home Chefs

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Wash and dry the fresh produce. Heat a large pot of salted water to boiling on high. Cut off and discard the root ends of the scallions thinly slice the scallions, separating the white bottoms and green tops. Shell the peas. Snap off and discard the tough, woody ends of the asparagus cut the asparagus into ½-inch pieces on an angle. Peel and mince the shallot to get 2 tablespoons of minced shallot (you may have extra) place in a medium bowl with the vinegar and season with salt and pepper to taste. Cut off and discard the root end of the lettuce separate the leaves. Pick the mint leaves off the stems discard the stems.

Add the pasta to the pot of boiling water. Cook 6 to 8 minutes, or until just shy of al dente (still slightly firm to the bite). Reserving ¾ cup of the pasta cooking water, thoroughly drain the cooked pasta. Set aside in a warm place.

While the pasta cooks, in a large pan, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the peas, asparagus and white bottoms of the scallions season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 1 to 2 minutes, or until the asparagus and peas are bright green. Add the heavy cream and simmer, stirring occasionally, 3 to 5 minutes, or until the sauce has thickened.

While the vegetables and sauce simmer, add the mustard to the shallot-vinegar mixture. Whisk in 2 tablespoons of olive oil until thoroughly combined.

To the pan of vegetables and sauce, add the cooked pasta, Parmesan cheese, butter and ½ cup of the reserved pasta cooking water season with salt and pepper to taste. Cook, stirring frequently, 2 to 4 minutes, or until the pasta is thoroughly coated. (If the sauce seems dry, gradually add the remaining pasta cooking water to achieve your desired consistency.) Transfer to a serving dish.

Place the lettuce in a large bowl season with salt and pepper. Add enough of the dressing to coat the lettuce (you may have extra dressing) toss to mix and season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to a serving dish. Garnish the finished pasta with the mint. Garnish the pasta and salad with the green tops of the scallions. Enjoy!


Strozzapreti Pasta with Lamb Sausage, Chilies & Olives

  • Author: Sabrina Russo
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 3 servings 1 x

Description

After coming across this beautiful lamb sausage at a local shop, I knew I wanted to come up with a few creative dishes to utilize it. That’s how this Strozzapreti Pasta with Lamb Sausage, Chilies & Olives came to be.

Ingredients

  • ½ lb strozzapreti pasta, or pasta of choice
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, plus more for serving
  • 8 oz Italian lamb sausage, removed from casing, or ground lamb*
  • 1 – 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 – 2 fresno chilies, thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup castelvetrano olives, pitted, roughly chopped
  • ¼ cup grana padano or parmigiano reggiano cheese, freshly grated, plus more for serving
  • 1 /3 cup parsley leaves and tender stems, roughly chopped
  • Kosher salt and fresh cracked pepper

Instructions

  1. Cook pasta: Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add pasta and cook until al dente. Drain, reserving one cup of cooking water.
  2. Brown sausage: While the pasta cooks, heat oil in a large sauté pan over medium to medium-high heat. Add sausage, breaking up in the pan, and cook 6-8 minutes or until well-browned.
  3. Make sauce & toss pasta: Reduce heat to medium. Stir garlic into sausage and sauté for 30 seconds. Stir in chilies and olives. Toss pasta in sausage mixture. Stir in cheese with a splash of reserved pasta water, or more as needed. Sauté about 2-3 minutes, or until mixture thickens. Toss in parsley. Taste and adjust seasoning, if needed.
  4. Serve: Drizzle over finishing oil and top with more grated cheese. Enjoy.

Notes

If using ground lamb, season generously with salt and pepper while browning in pan.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1/3 of pasta
  • Calories: 318
  • Sugar: 2g
  • Sodium: 384mg
  • Fat: 15g
  • Saturated Fat: 4g
  • Carbohydrates: 31g
  • Fiber: 2g
  • Protein: 15g

Keywords: pasta, sausage, chilies, olives

Did you make this recipe?


Salt-As-You-Go Pasta

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Here's The 1st Ramps Dish Of The Season Being Served In NYC

Today we received an important alert over Twitter from Tarallucci E Vino on East 18th Street, letting us know that they. have. ramps. THE ramps. The ramps we dream of all winter. The ramps that signal spring is here. It's all happening.

We immediately reached out to the restaurant, and Amanda Darrach there told us that "the ramps came from South Carolina," where Chef Andrew Welch has relationships with some foragers. It's pretty typical for restaurants, likely because of these relationships, to get a jump on the general public at the start of ramps season, happens every year. But our time will come.

In the meantime, tonight you can eat ramps. Right here in New York City. On their menu they've got an $18 appetizer featuring grilled ramps, crispy pork belly, parsnip purée, and beech mushrooms (pictured). We're told that they'll have more ramps on Thursday for a strozzapreti with fava beans & ramps dish. And now, your moment of Zen:


Chef gently grasps a bunch of 2014 ramps. (Tarallucci E Vino)


Watch the video: 2 Michelin-starred chef Phil Howard creates hand cut strozzapreti with pulled rabbit (January 2022).